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Libdrizzle News

Official Drizzle Blog: Drizzle joins Software in the Public Interest, can take (tax-deductible) donations

Thu, 10/06/2011 - 13:36

Since it's inception in 2008 Drizzle has taken the approach of an open
source community project. It's been run as a meritocracy by its
developer community, with developers from various companies and just
individuals. Even though at first Sun and then Rackspace did sponsor a
core team to work full time on the project, the project is not owned
by any particular company, but Drizzle is developed by a vibrant and
diverse community. We've been proud to have between 20-40 active
contributors each month.

With the first stable release in March 2011, interest in the project
grew. At this point we also decided it was time to solidify and
clarify the status of the project as a non-profit community project.
Out of a couple options available, we chose to become an Associated
Project at the Software in the Public
Interest
. The SPI is a charitable US non-profit corporations that
acts as an umbrella
organization to many open source projects
, including some well
known ones like Debian and PostgreSQL. Drizzle was accepted as an SPI
Associated Project by the Board on August
10th
.

At this point, we would like to extend our gratitude to Josh Berkus (a
PostgreSQL lead developer) who guided and sponsored Drizzle through
the application process! We appreciate not just your experience and
expertise with the SPI, but also the gesture of friendly help between
two open source database projects.

Having a legal entity behind Drizzle has a number of useful benefits
and any open source project that is bigger than just one or two guys
should seriously consider using one of these umbrella organizations.

One benefit that is available to us starting this week is that you can
now donate money to Drizzle via the SPI. The easiest way to donate is
using a credit card at Click & Pledge. The SPI website lists some alternative methods such as
using a cheque. For US tax payers donations are tax-deductible and if
you are a business you can of course write the donation off as an
expense.

Donations made via the SPI bank account will be properly accounted for
by the SPI treasurer. Please read above links on how to "earmark" your
donation for Drizzle. Available funds will be used by the Drizzle
project primary for expenses such as legal or IT infrastructure and
secondary for arranging developer meetings and if possible sponsoring
attendance at conferences. Note that if you want to sponsor
development of Drizzle, such as a particular feature, and you have a
large enough budget to be usable for that purpose, we recommend you
rather contract such development directly via one of the
commercial service providers that employ Drizzle developers
.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Patrick Crews: Drizzle multi-master testing!

Tue, 10/04/2011 - 21:19

So, it has been a while since I’ve blogged.  As some of you may have read, I have a new job and Stewart and I have been busy planning all kinds of testing goodness for Percona >: ) (I’ve also been recovering from trying to keep up with Stewart!)

Rest assured, gentle readers, that I have not forgotten everyone’s favorite modular, community-driven database ; )  Not by a long-shot.  I have some major improvements to dbqp getting ready for a merge (think randgen in-tree / additional testing modes / multiple basedirs of multiple types).  Additionally, I’ve been cooking up some code to test the mighty Mr. Shrews’ multi-master code (mwa ha ha!)

What I’ve done is allow for a new option to be used with a test’s .cnf file (this is a dbqp thing, won’t work with standard drizzle-test-run).  If the runner sees this request, it will generate a multi-master config file from the specified servers’ individual slave.cnf files. 

Here is a sample config:

[test_servers]
servers = [[--innodb.replication-log],[--innodb.replication-log],[--plugin-add=slave --slave.config-file=$MASTER_SERVER_SLAVE_CONFIG]]

[s2]
# we tell the system that we want
# to generate a multi-master cnf file
# for the 3rd server to use, that
# has the first two servers as masters
# the final file is written to the first
# server's general slave.cnf file
gen_multi_master_cnf= 0,1

A good rundown of the file’s contents can be found on Shrews’ blog here, but the end result looks like this:

ignore-errors

[master1]
master-host=127.0.0.1
master-port=9306
master-user=root
master-pass=''

[master2]
master-host=127.0.0.1
master-port=9312
master-user=root
master-pass=''

I tried cooking up a basic test case where we spin up 3 servers – 2 masters and one slave.  One master 1, we create table t1:


CREATE TABLE t1 (a int not null auto_increment, primary key(a));

On master 2, table t2:


CREATE TABLE t2 (a int not null auto_increment, primary key(a));

We insert some records into both tables, then check that our slave has everything! Sounds simple, right?

Sigh. If only. It seems that we are running into some issues when we try to record the test – you can read the bug here

We see some interesting output in the slave’s logs before it crashes:

$ cat workdir/bot0/s2/var/log/s2.err
InnoDB: Doublewrite buffer not found: creating new
InnoDB: Doublewrite buffer created
InnoDB: 127 rollback segment(s) active.
InnoDB: Creating foreign key constraint system tables
InnoDB: Foreign key constraint system tables created
(SQLSTATE 00000) Duplicate entry '772-1' for key 'PRIMARY'
Failure while executing:
INSERT INTO `sys_replication`.`queue` (`master_id`, `trx_id`, `seg_id`, `commit_order`, `originating_server_uuid`, `originating_commit_id`, `msg`) VALUES (2, 772, 1, 1, 'ac9c8ac0-8f10-474b-9bbd-b61d2cdb2b93' , 1, 'transaction_context {
server_id: 1
transaction_id: 772
start_timestamp: 1317760732106016
end_timestamp: 1317760732106017
}
event {
type: STARTUP
}
segment_id: 1
end_segment: true
')

Replication slave: Unable to insert into queue.
Replication slave: drizzle_state_read:lost connection to server (EOF)
Lost connection to master. Reconnecting.
Replication slave: drizzle_state_connect:could not connect
111004 16:39:05 InnoDB: Starting shutdown...

Additionally, you can just try the setup with –start-and-exit:

$ ./dbqp --suite=slave --start-and-exit multi_master_basic
20111004-170033 INFO Using Drizzle source tree:

20111004-170033 INFO Taking clean db snapshot...
20111004-170033 INFO Taking clean db snapshot...
20111004-170033 INFO Taking clean db snapshot...
20111004-170035 INFO bot0 server:
20111004-170035 INFO NAME: s0
20111004-170035 INFO MASTER_PORT: 9306
20111004-170035 INFO DRIZZLE_TCP_PORT: 9307
20111004-170035 INFO MC_PORT: 9308
20111004-170035 INFO PBMS_PORT: 9309
20111004-170035 INFO RABBITMQ_NODE_PORT: 9310
20111004-170035 INFO VARDIR: /drizzle_mm_test/tests/workdir/bot0/s0/var
20111004-170035 INFO STATUS: 1
20111004-170035 INFO bot0 server:
20111004-170035 INFO NAME: s1
20111004-170035 INFO MASTER_PORT: 9312
20111004-170035 INFO DRIZZLE_TCP_PORT: 9313
20111004-170035 INFO MC_PORT: 9314
20111004-170035 INFO PBMS_PORT: 9315
20111004-170035 INFO RABBITMQ_NODE_PORT: 9316
20111004-170035 INFO VARDIR: /drizzle_mm_test/tests/workdir/bot0/s1/var
20111004-170035 INFO STATUS: 1
20111004-170035 INFO bot0 server:
20111004-170035 INFO NAME: s2
20111004-170035 INFO MASTER_PORT: 9318
20111004-170035 INFO DRIZZLE_TCP_PORT: 9319
20111004-170035 INFO MC_PORT: 9320
20111004-170035 INFO PBMS_PORT: 9321
20111004-170035 INFO RABBITMQ_NODE_PORT: 9322
20111004-170035 INFO VARDIR: /drizzle_mm_test/tests/workdir/bot0/s2/var
20111004-170035 INFO STATUS: 1
20111004-170035 INFO User specified --start-and-exit. dbqp.py exiting and leaving servers running...
pcrews@mister:/drizzle_mm_test/tests$ ps -al
F S UID PID PPID C PRI NI ADDR SZ WCHAN TTY TIME CMD
0 S 1000 18652 1 2 80 0 - 112094 poll_s pts/2 00:00:00 lt-drizzled
0 S 1000 18688 1 3 80 0 - 112096 poll_s pts/2 00:00:00 lt-drizzled
0 S 1000 18721 1 3 80 0 - 156326 poll_s pts/2 00:00:00 lt-drizzled
0 R 1000 18780 15985 0 80 0 - 3375 - pts/2 00:00:00 ps
0 S 1000 32463 30047 0 80 0 - 11272 poll_s pts/1 00:00:01 ssh

From here, we can connect to the slave and check out sys_replication.applier_state:

$ drizzle -uroot -p9318 test
Reading table information for completion of table and column names
You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A

Welcome to the Drizzle client.. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your Drizzle connection id is 216
Connection protocol: mysql
Server version: 2011.09.26.2427 Source distribution (drizzle_mm_test)

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the buffer.

drizzle> use sys_replication;
Reading table information for completion of table and column names
You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A

Schema changed
drizzle> show tables;
+---------------------------+
| Tables_in_sys_replication |
+---------------------------+
| applier_state |
| io_state |
| queue |
+---------------------------+
3 rows in set (0.001641 sec)

drizzle> select * from applier_state;
+-----------+------------------------+--------------------------------------+-----------------------+---------+-----------+
| master_id | last_applied_commit_id | originating_server_uuid | originating_commit_id | status | error_msg |
+-----------+------------------------+--------------------------------------+-----------------------+---------+-----------+
| 1 | 0 | f716781f-8c00-4b81-82c6-62039136d616 | 0 | RUNNING | |
| 2 | 3 | df7f2f6e-dba4-43ea-a674-fa4a3709865b | 3 | RUNNING | |
+-----------+------------------------+--------------------------------------+-----------------------+---------+-----------+
2 rows in set (0.000928 sec)

drizzle> select * from io_state;
+-----------+---------+-----------+
| master_id | status | error_msg |
+-----------+---------+-----------+
| 1 | STOPPED | |
| 2 | RUNNING | |
+-----------+---------+-----------+
2 rows in set (0.000839 sec)

drizzle>

So, it looks like the slave knows about both masters, but for some reason, the applier from master 1 is stopped : (
At any rate, there is a bug open on this and it could be something in my config(?) It’s been a while since I’ve played with replication and I know there has been some tinkering under the hood since then : )

The branch with the test code can be found here:
lp:~patrick-crews/drizzle/dbqp_multi_master_test

At the very least, we can now create tests that use this feature, which will help ensure that it stays on the path of solid code in the future! How about anyone out there? Has anyone been using multi-master? If so, can you share any setups / tests? Extra information would be most appreciated : )

Categories: Libdrizzle News

MySQL Performance Blog: Percona Welcomes Patrick Crews

Mon, 10/03/2011 - 23:13

I am very happy to welcome Patrick Crews to the Percona development team. Patrick joins Percona at a very exciting time for the development team. We are getting regular releases of Percona Server and Percona Xtrabackup out the door, we have been heavily using the Jenkins continuous integration system to maintain and improve the quality of the products we ship and we just upgraded our documentation publishing platform for both Percona Server (5.1 and 5.5) and Percona Xtrabackup.

We are at the natural point to expand our QA efforts – and that’s where Patrick joins us.

Patrick has been doing QA in the MySQL world for a while now, and has extensive experience with both MySQL and Drizzle. His work has included use of a variety of testing tools such as the randgen (random query generator) project to which he contributes.

As a Drizzle developer, he saw the code get to its first GA release. This included testing a completely rewritten replication system, drizzledump’s evolution to a migration tool, as well as creating a new pluggable testing system for the project (dbqp – expect to hear a lot more on this in the months to come).

Patrick’s role will have him working on both Percona Server, XtraDB, and XtraBackup. This will include creating more advanced tests and test systems for our development needs which will naturally also improve the testing of Drizzle due to sharing of common code.

Patrick has a blog over at www.wc220.com where he writes about Drizzle QA and other topics.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

MySQL Performance Blog: Updated Percona Server and Percona XtraBackup documentation

Mon, 10/03/2011 - 07:07

We’ve just gone live with a new way of publishing and maintaining documentation for Percona Server and Percona XtraBackup. We are now using Sphinx to generate the documentation that we publish on the web site. Sphinx was originally created for the new Python documentation, and has won us over due to the simple markup, ease of cross-referencing, ability to keep our documentation source along with our source code and support for multiple output formats.

This moves our documentation workflow to be the same as for source code. A developer (or writer) will create a bzr branch on launchpad and submit a merge request. This means documentation review now goes through the same system as code review.

We have also set up a Jenkins job to automatically update the documentation on the percona.com web site when changes are made to the source repositories. This means that bug fixes and improvements to the documentation can transparently and automatically be published with a minimal amount of turn-around.

An added benefit for XtraBackup is that it it will enable us to easily share documentation for the Drizzle version of XtraBackup as Drizzle uses Sphinx for its documentation too. The new setup for Percona documentation was based on that of the Drizzle project.

The end result? Better and more frequently updated documentation.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Stewart Smith: Speaking at Percona Live London 2011 (on Drizzle!)

Sun, 10/02/2011 - 23:15

Both Henrik and myself will be at Percona Live London 2011 in late October speaking on the wonderful Drizzle database server.

Other speakers at the conference will be talking about a wide range of topics surrounding the MySQL ecosystem including performance monitoring, backup, search, scaling and data recovery.

P.S. I do have a discount code – ask me in the comments for it!

Categories: Libdrizzle News

MySQL Performance Blog: Speaking at HighLoad conference, Moscow, Russia, Training and Hiring

Fri, 09/30/2011 - 14:27

I’m going to be speaking on Highload++ conference October 3,4 in Moscow, Russia. This is a great conference which gathers amazing quality of speakers from Russia and around the world and I usually learn a lot and enjoy talking to a lot of great people on this event.

My talk is going to be about new developments in MySQL Server 5.5, 5.6, Percona Server, MariaDB and Drizzle as it relates to high volume/large scale projects. There is a lot of really cool things happening in MySQL space recently and I would love to share those with you.

I’m also doing a training session 5th of October, which will be in depth training session based on Percona’s Training for MySQL Developers. In fact this is a great learning experience both for MySQL Developers and DBAs and this is unique opportunity to attend this course
given in Russian. Bring your laptop if you have one for more Hands On experience.

If you would like to do business with Percona I will be available for business development and consulting meetings on Thursday and Friday next week.

Finally note We’re Hiring worldwide for most of positions, so if you’re interested joining Percona Team, come and talk to me. We have both technical and non technical positions, in particular we’re looking for Sales and Business Development person in Russia.

Why so late announcement. Ah if you must know I did not know if I will be able to make it until very last minute. My passport was stalled in the British Consulate getting visa to UK for Percona Live London in late October. It is great we could get the documents back in time for my travel.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Brian Aker: Spoon full of Sugar, Oracle and the Open Core Model

Thu, 09/29/2011 - 20:25
(Reposted from blog.krow.net)

From the 451 Group:
“MySQL flirted with the open core licensing model in early 2008 with plans to introduce new features into Enterprise Edition that would not be available under an open source license.”

MySQL didn’t flirt with, it was going to do it.

Why? Because we were asking the question, “how do we pull in customers to make more money”.

MySQL was going to put the new backup API, which never materialized, into an Enterprise branch.

It was a lousy idea for the following reasons:

1) There was no internal API in the server for this, so the engineering was going to be messy and expensive.

2) We didn’t own the technology that was needed to even do this (Oracle owned Hot Backup)

3) Percona has an awesome tool for doing this, that is Open Source (http://www.percona.com/software/percona-xtrabackup/)

4) Backup is a core feature everyone needs, and some of those “everyones” are the folks who manufacture tools that you want to have work with your product.

5) When we were going to announce it, we hadn’t even written it/completed it. It was vaporware.

It would have been a horrible move, and would have caused Chaos for no particular reason. It was dead on arrival, and when it was to be announced as a strategy since it didn’t even exist.

Lets look at Oracle’s move. Both the authentication module, and the Thread Pool come into the MySQL server as plugins. If the engineering of the MySQL server continues in the current direction (which is somewhat flattering to Drizzle I might add), then they are on a good path (if I can find my blog entry where I talked about this as a good strategy, I’ll link back to it here).

Much of the hubbub around Open Source, Community, etc, in regards to this are a bit inflated I feel. They haven’t touched the core product, and they are creating API. Are they possibly hurting themselves in regards to ubiquity?

Doubtful.

Would I pick those two pieces? No, but they aren’t the last two I would pick either. If Sun had continued as a company?

Something similar to this would have been done as well.

From an engineering and usage stand point?

The first person who sniffs at the authentication mechanism who knows anything about security is going to freak.

The Thread Pool can only be used by a very limited number of users (and there are some restrictions on what can be done in the server while it is in use). MySQL’s IO was never designed for the Thread Pool, and there is a lot of engineering work that would need to be done to make it work.

Still? People will use both, and I am betting some customers will want them badly enough to pay.

If they are really badly needed? Well then someone will write an open source version of both.

I have no great love of Oracle, but this is really not a big deal at all. The original GPL’ing of the Public Domain/LGPL clients was a much bigger deal.
Categories: Libdrizzle News

Brian Aker: Spoon full of Sugar, Oracle and the Open Core Model

Thu, 09/29/2011 - 20:17

From the 451 Group:
“MySQL flirted with the open core licensing model in early 2008 with plans to introduce new features into Enterprise Edition that would not be available under an open source license.”


MySQL didn’t flirt with, it was going to do it. 


Why? Because we were asking the question, “how do we pull in customers to make more money”. 


MySQL was going to put the new backup API, which never materialized, into an Enterprise branch. 


It was a lousy idea for the following reasons:


1) There was no internal API in the server for this, so the engineering was going to be messy and expensive. 


2) We didn’t own the technology that was needed to even do this (Oracle owned Hot Backup)


3) Percona has an awesome tool for doing this, that is Open Source (http://www.percona.com/software/percona-xtrabackup/)


4) Backup is a core feature everyone needs, and some of those “everyones” are the folks who manufacture tools that you want to have work with your product.


5) When we were going to announce it, we hadn’t even written it/completed it. It was vaporware. 


It would have been a horrible move, and would have caused Chaos for no particular reason. It was dead on arrival, and when it was to be announced as a strategy since it didn’t even exist. 

Lets look at Oracle’s move. Both the authentication module, and the Thread Pool come into the MySQL server as plugins. If the engineering of the MySQL server continues in the current direction (which is somewhat flattering to Drizzle I might add), then they are on a good path (if I can find my blog entry where I talked about this as a good strategy, I’ll link back to it here). 

Much of the hubbub around Open Source, Community, etc, in regards to this are a bit inflated I feel. They haven’t touched the core product, and they are creating API. Are they possibly hurting themselves in regards to ubiquity?

Doubtful. 

Would I pick those two pieces? No, but they aren’t the last two I would pick either.  If Sun had continued as a company? Something similar to this would have been done as well.

From an engineering and usage stand point?

The first person who sniffs at the authentication mechanism who knows anything about security is going to freak.

The Thread Pool can only be used by a very limited number of users (and there are some restrictions on what can be done in the server while it is in use). MySQL’s IO was never designed for the Thread Pool, and there is a lot of engineering work that would need to be done to make it work. 

Still? People will use both, and I am betting some customers will want them badly enough to pay. 

If they are really badly needed? Well then someone will write an open source version of both.

I have no great love of Oracle, but this is really not a big deal at all. The original GPL’ing of the Public Domain/LGPL clients was a much bigger deal.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Brian Aker: Spoon full of Sugar, Oracle and the Open Core Model

Thu, 09/29/2011 - 13:17

From the 451 Group:
“MySQL flirted with the open core licensing model in early 2008 with plans to introduce new features into Enterprise Edition that would not be available under an open source license.”



MySQL didn’t flirt with, it was going to do it. 



Why? Because we were asking the question, “how do we pull in customers to make more money”. 



MySQL was going to put the new backup API, which never materialized, into an Enterprise branch. 



It was a lousy idea for the following reasons:



1) There was no internal API in the server for this, so the engineering was going to be messy and expensive. 



2) We didn’t own the technology that was needed to even do this (Oracle owned Hot Backup)



3) Percona has an awesome tool for doing this, that is Open Source (http://www.percona.com/software/percona-xtrabackup/)



4) Backup is a core feature everyone needs, and some of those “everyones” are the folks who manufacture tools that you want to have work with your product.



5) When we were going to announce it, we hadn’t even written it/completed it. It was vaporware. 



It would have been a horrible move, and would have caused Chaos for no particular reason. It was dead on arrival, and when it was to be announced as a strategy since it didn’t even exist. 


Lets look at Oracle’s move. Both the authentication module, and the Thread Pool come into the MySQL server as plugins. If the engineering of the MySQL server continues in the current direction (which is somewhat flattering to Drizzle I might add), then they are on a good path (if I can find my blog entry where I talked about this as a good strategy, I’ll link back to it here). 


Much of the hubbub around Open Source, Community, etc, in regards to this are a bit inflated I feel. They haven’t touched the core product, and they are creating API. Are they possibly hurting themselves in regards to ubiquity?


Doubtful. 


Would I pick those two pieces? No, but they aren’t the last two I would pick either.  If Sun had continued as a company? Something similar to this would have been done as well.


From an engineering and usage stand point?


The first person who sniffs at the authentication mechanism who knows anything about security is going to freak.


The Thread Pool can only be used by a very limited number of users (and there are some restrictions on what can be done in the server while it is in use). MySQL’s IO was never designed for the Thread Pool, and there is a lot of engineering work that would need to be done to make it work. 


Still? People will use both, and I am betting some customers will want them badly enough to pay. 


If they are really badly needed? Well then someone will write an open source version of both.


I have no great love of Oracle, but this is really not a big deal at all. The original GPL’ing of the Public Domain/LGPL clients was a much bigger deal.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Official Drizzle Blog: Drizzle at Percona Live

Tue, 09/27/2011 - 20:29

Thinking of attending the upcoming Percona Live event in London, but not yet registered?  Use discount code DrizzlePLUK and save 40 pounds off normal registration.

Community members Henrik Ingo and Stewart Smith will be there and both will be presenting on Drizzle.  Hope to see you there!

 

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Official Drizzle Blog: Drizzle source tarball 2011.09.26 has been released.

Tue, 09/27/2011 - 20:23

Drizzle source tarball, version 2011.09.26 has been released.  This is one of the final releases before the Fremont beta and consists of mostly polish.  Many thanks to those who have contributed time and effort into testing things.

In this release:

  • Documentation updates. Thanks to everyone who has contributed edits / new documentation
  • IPV6 bug fixes - continued polish of this new feature
  • Query log improvements - thanks to Daniel Nichter (and also for his docs work!)

The Drizzle download file can be found here.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Henrik Ingo: Upcoming conferences: Highload++ Moscow and Percona Live London

Fri, 09/23/2011 - 07:37

October brings 2 very interesting conferences. I will be speaking first on Oct 3rd at HighLoad++ in Moscow and a few weeks later on Oct Oct 25 at Percona Live in London. I will give a talk called Choosing a MySQL Replication / High Availability Solution which is based on my thinking developed in my recent blog post The ultimate MySQL high availability solution and many benchmarks and functional tests I've done while evaluating these technologies.

At Percona Live I will also give a second talk Fixed in Drizzle: No more GOTCHA's. It looked like none of the Drizzle core team would be able to attend the conference and as I was going to be there I volunteered to cover a Drizzle topic at the same time. This is a talk Stewart Smith has given a few times at earlier conferences which I liked and proposed to Percona. As it turns out, also Stewart will be in London after all, so there will be 2 Drizzle talks, I will still give the one I'm committed to.

read more

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Daniel Nichter: Drizzle query_log parser

Thu, 09/22/2011 - 22:40
Drizzle trunk as of 2011-09-20 (r2422) has a new revision of my query_log plugin which is important because that revision works with the latest trunk revision of mk-query-digest (wget maatkit.org/trunk/mk-query-digest). I made the query log format truly consistent and then wrote DrizzleQueryLogParser for mk-query-digest and added the command line option --type drizzlelog. I don’t intend [...]
Categories: Libdrizzle News

Stewart Smith: MySQL no longer fully open source database

Thu, 09/15/2011 - 20:43

Just in case anybody missed it: http://blogs.oracle.com/MySQL/entry/new_commercial_extensions_for_mysql

MySQL has long been an open source product, not an open source project…. and this really is the final nail in that.

To me, this was expected, but it’s still sad to see it.

I am very, very glad we have diverse copyright ownership in Drizzle so that this could not happen easily at all.

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Daniel Nichter: Authenticating with authentication plugins

Thu, 09/08/2011 - 03:39
For months I’ve been perplexed that Drizzle authentication plugins did not seem to work. I filed bug 823637, asked on the mailing list, and made it need #1. I finally discovered how to authentication with authentication plugins like auth_pam: drizzle -u daniel -P --protocol mysql-plugin-auth. The final command line option is the key: --protocol mysql-plugin-auth. [...]
Categories: Libdrizzle News

Daniel Nichter: Why is Python slower?

Thu, 09/01/2011 - 01:11
My recent post on a new 95 percentile algo mentions a Python version of the algo. I’ve chosen Python 3 for development of new Drizzle tools. Problem is: the Python version of that algo is almost 3 times slower than the Perl version; here are the results (where “OLD” is Perl and “NEW” is Python): [...]
Categories: Libdrizzle News

Official Drizzle Blog: Drizzle source tarball 2011.08.25 has been released

Tue, 08/30/2011 - 18:37

Drizzle source tarball, version 2011.08.25 has been released.

In this release:

  • NOTE: Drizzle behavior now allows 0 to mean NULL, but NULL to mean 0
  • Work on IPV6 data type - thanks to Muhammad Umair for hacking on this
  • Continued code refactoring - thanks to Olaf for his work as always
  • Various bug fixes

The Drizzle download file can be found here

Categories: Libdrizzle News

Henrik Ingo: Stored procedures in JavaScript? (My Drizzle repository can do it)

Sun, 08/28/2011 - 21:45

Just wanted to record for the history books that:


drizzle> select js_eval('var d = new Date(); "Drizzle started running JavaScript at: " + d;')\g
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| js_eval('var d = new Date(); "Drizzle started running JavaScript at: " + d;') |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Drizzle started running JavaScript at: Mon Aug 29 2011 00:23:31 GMT+0300 (EEST) |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.001792 sec)

I will push this onto launchpad tomorrow, after a good nights sleep and final code cleanups.

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Categories: Libdrizzle News

Daniel Nichter: Drizzle merges query_log

Wed, 08/17/2011 - 22:57
The Drizzle developers merged my query_log plugin into Drizzle 2011.08.24. This is great news not only because it addresses need #3 but because Drizzle query_log solves every problem that ever plagued the MySQL slow log. Since I had free reign to design whatever I wanted, I designed the log format to be consistent, logical, and [...]
Categories: Libdrizzle News

Official Drizzle Blog: Drizzle source tarball 2011.08.24 has been released

Tue, 08/16/2011 - 20:34

Drizzle source tarball, version 2011.08.24 has been released.

We getting closer to the Drizzle 7.1 / Fremont beta.  Please keep the feedback coming!

In this release:

  • New plugin to publish transactions to zeromq, courtesy of Marcus Eriksson, author of the Drizzle jdbc driver!
  • Continued code refactoring - many thanks to Olaf van der Spek for his efforts here
  • Tweaks to the query log plugin from Daniel Nichter (gracias, sir!)
  • Various bug fixes

The Drizzle download file can be found here

Categories: Libdrizzle News

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